Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma (SEGA)

A subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a benign brain tumor made of large, star-shaped cells called astrocytes. This mass grows in the fluid-filled spaces within the brain called ventricles. It only affects people with tuberous sclerosis, a genetic disease that makes certain types of tumors grow in the body. Most people who develop SEGAs are under 20.

Overview

Symptoms

SEGA can cause fluid build-up in the brain. If the tumor gets large enough to press against the brain, symptoms may include:

  • Changes in personality or behavior
  • Headaches
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Memory problems
  • Seizures
  • Speech difficulties
  • Vision disturbances
  • Weakness or loss of sensation on one side of the body

Diagnosis

First, you’ll meet with your doctor for a physical exam to discuss your symptoms. Then, your doctor may order imaging tests such as an MRI or a CT scan.

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Treatment Options

If you have subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, your Aurora care team, including neurologists and neurosurgeons from the Aurora Neuroscience Innovation Institute, will work with you to find the right treatment plan to fit your needs. 

SEGA treatments may include:

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